Ganga basin stare at three-fold rise in crop failures by 2040, Sufficient sleep cuts risk of cardiovascular disease, Salivary protein biomarkers of breast, ovarian cancer metastasis identified, The arjuna, a keystone tree in Cauvery’s river-forests ~ helpBIOTECH

25 February 2019

Ganga basin stare at three-fold rise in crop failures by 2040, Sufficient sleep cuts risk of cardiovascular disease, Salivary protein biomarkers of breast, ovarian cancer metastasis identified, The arjuna, a keystone tree in Cauvery’s river-forests



Ganga basin States stare at three-fold rise in crop failures by 2040 - The Hindu 

As flows decline and pollution worsens, there will be less irrigation and drinking water available in Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh.

The Ganga river basin could see crop failures rise three-fold and drinking water shortage go up by as much as 39% in some States between now and 2040, says an assessment commissioned by the World Bank and submitted to the Central Water Commission. 


Sufficient sleep cuts risk of cardiovascular disease - The Hindu 

Scientists have discovered that sleep helps regulate the production in the bone marrow of inflammatory cells and the health of blood vessels and that, conversely, sleep disruption breaks down control of inflammatory cell production, leading to more inflammation and more heart disease,” said Filip Swirski, from Massachusetts General Hospital in the U.S. 


Salivary protein biomarkers of breast, ovarian cancer metastasis identified - The Hindu

Researchers at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Roorkee have taken the first step to identify certain proteins found in saliva that can be used as potential biomarkers indicative of breast and ovarian cancer metastasis. The composition and expression of salivary gland-derived proteins are altered in people with breast and ovarian cancer. So studying the salivary proteins may offer an easy alternative for screening cancer patients. 


The arjuna, a keystone tree in Cauvery’s river-forests- The Hindu 

The arjuna tree (Terminalia arjuna) may be best known for its medicinal properties and its importance to the charismatic grizzled giant squirrel, but it plays a special role in the river-forests of Karnataka's Cauvery Wildlife Sanctuary too. A higher number of trees specific to riverine habitats thrive under the canopies of old arjuna trees. The soil under these trees' enormous canopies is also more moist and higher in organic carbon. This makes a case to recognize it as a keystone species — one that plays a crucial role in the landscape — and conserve large, old trees, say scientists. 


Eight-eyed and everywhere - The Hindu 

At least five new species of jumping spiders have been discovered from different parts of India over the past year 


0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner